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Painful joints? Consider Rosehip

Wednesday March 26, 2014 at 6:07pm
Rosehip as an approach to painful joints

Last Updated: 13th April 2016

Many hundreds of thousands of people in Britain suffer from rheumatoid arthritis - a debilitating auto-immune disease that causes inflammation, swelling and pain in the joints. Over time, the body's own attack of the cells lining the joints can permanently damage the joint itself, the cartilage and the nearby bone. There is no known cure for rheumatoid arthritis however, early diagnosis and treatment can control the symptoms.

The latest medication and 'smart' drugs which target different parts of the immune system are available, however an alternative herbal remedy which may help comes in the form of Rosehip tablets.

A powerful natural anti-inflammatory

Rosehip is a herbal medication with anti-inflammatory properties. Rosehip is also a good source of Vitamins A, C and E and carotenoids such as beta carotene, lycopene and lutein which scientists agree boost the immune system. It contains polyphenols and anthocyanins, which are believed to ease joint inflammation and prevent joint damage.

It is one of the most concentrated natural sources of Vitamin C - studies show its Vitamin C properties absorb twice as fast as synthetic supplements.

It is also a very powerful antioxidant, i.e. it combats harmful molecules called free radicals which are produced within your cells causing tissue damage or disease. 

Rosehip is also great for increased energy and motivation, boosting your immunity and general well-being.

Rosehip and rheumatoid arthritis

Research from Germany and Denmark looked at 74 sufferers, mostly females, over a 6 month trial. Just under half took a Rosehip remedy while the others took a placebo. Both groups continued to take their usual medication. According to results the number of joints causing pain or discomfort fell by 40%, but did not change for those treated with the placebo. Patients also reported a better quality of life and less pain.

In another trial, 89 participants with rheumatoid arthritis were randomly assigned 5g of Rosehip powder or placebo powder once a day for six months.Those who received Rosehip reported greater improvements in disease activity, quality of life, physical function and physical global assessment than the placebo group.

Rosehip and osteoarthritis

One of the most common forms of joint disease is osteoarthritis, which affects around 9 million people in the UK, causing pain, stiffness and reduced mobility. Almost anyone can get osteoarthritis but it’s more likely in people over 40, and even more so in women. Other influencing factors include genetics, weight, previous joint injuries, job type (i.e. physically demanding / requiring repetitive movement) or if your joints have been damaged by another disease, for example gout.

A study published in 2005 in the Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology found that Rosehip extract may help reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients. After just 3 weeks patients taking Rosehip extract found an 82 per cent reduction in pain.  An earlier study also found that those who took the supplement only needed half as many traditional painkillers.  

In another clinical trial the outcome of treatment with 5g Rosehip was compared with a placebo in 94 people with osteoarthritis. After 3 weeks of treatments, Rosehip resulted in a significant reduction in pain scores and painkiller use compared to the placebo. After 15 weeks, participants who were given Rosehip had a significant reduction in pain, stiffness, disability and painkiller use as well as a significant improvement in the overall severity of the disease compared to participants in the placebo group.

Both rheumatoid and osteoarthritis are conditions in which inflammation plays an important role. Rosehips contain chemicals called tannins, polypenols, flavonoids and fatty oils which are recognised by scientists for their anti-inflammatory properties.

» Categories: Health News, Product Info


Monday April 7, 2014 at 4:10pm by Anna
I must get some
Thursday April 10, 2014 at 8:43am by Shirley
I must get some of them in terrible pain will try anything lol
Replied to on: Friday April 11, 2014 at 10:16am
We're sorry to hear that you are in pain. Rosehip is one of our best selling supplements, and we genuinely get a great amount of feedback on its effectiveness too, so it may be worth giving it a try.
Thursday May 22, 2014 at 6:29pm by Anita
I have just completed my first month taking Rosehip tablets.What a difference ,pain has almost gone ,the stiffness in my hands has completely gone.I can't recommend highly enough.Give them a try,they are working for me.
Replied to on: Tuesday May 27, 2014 at 9:47pm
Thanks for the seal of approval! Our Rosehip supplement is very, very popular and we get a huge amount of positive feedback about it's efficacy. Thanks for adding your thoughts to the list. We work hard to ensure that we offer great quality products (often at the expense of our profit margin!) and it's great to hear that our supplements are making a difference to people's lives.
Wednesday October 7, 2015 at 11:20am by Joan rose
Im in pain with knee had xray clear but pain is unbearable
Replied to on: Wednesday October 7, 2015 at 2:04pm
Very sorry to hear about your painful knee. As mentioned on a previous comment, Rosehip is one of our best selling supplements so it may be worth giving it a try.
Saturday October 31, 2015 at 7:20pm by Norma brown
How much is the cost of these
Replied to on: Sunday November 1, 2015 at 8:34pm
You can buy Rosehip 5,000mg tablets from as little as £5.95 for 60 tablets. See
Tuesday August 9, 2016 at 9:17pm by do they interact with any othe
Do they interact with other medications please
Replied to on: Friday September 16, 2016 at 9:12am
There are no contra-indications that we are aware of, but you should check with your GP or a pharmacists about whether there are specific interactions with the particular medications that you are taking.
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