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Almonds improve cognitive ability

Monday November 6, 2017 at 10:06am
Almonds improve cognitive ability

Memory loss is described as the inability to remember information and events that would normally be recalled and it a symptom of neurological conditions such as dementia. While we may view forgetful episodes as a normal part of getting older it could also be a sign that something is missing in our diet.

The right sort of foods can boost our brain power, in fact some recent research has shown almonds to do just that.

Eating almonds at lunchtime improved memory in the afternoon

According to a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating almonds at lunchtime improved memory in the afternoon.

The reason is thought to be down to the fact that almonds have a positive effect on blood sugar levels by keeping them in balance - as we know low blood sugar levels affect brain function by making us feel foggy and sluggish.

In addition to this almonds are also packed with magnesium, which has shown to fight tiredness and fatigue. Other brain boosting nutrients found within the healthful nut are niacin, thiamin and folate.

The study was conducted by researchers based at Purdue University over a 3 month period and comprised 86 adults split into two groups.

One group was fed a diet enriched with almonds and the other group ate no almonds at all.

The results of the study showed that 30 minutes after lunch, the group who ate no almonds had a greater decline in memory.

Almonds have numerous health benefits

As well as helping to boost your cognitive abilities, you'll also be pleased to know that eating a handful of almonds per day has been associated with reducing stroke risk, lowering high blood pressure (known as hypertension) and due to their high potassium content they also balance out the negative effects of salt on blood pressure.

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